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How To Make Peppermint Oil

How to make peppermint oil using olive oil. All you need is fresh peppermint leaves, olive oil and a glass jar.

True peppermint oil you get in stores are manufactured by extracting oil from peppermint by heating the plant at low temperatures. The vapor that is created when heating the peppermint leaves is allowed to cool and form into a liquid. This liquid contains around 45 percent of menthol. Menthol is what gives peppermint its healing and aromatic qualities. Because of this, it is difficult to make the true peppermint at home. However, you can make peppermint oil infusion, which you can use for various purposes. This oil will not be as concentrated as the true peppermint oil, but still it will have the same qualities.
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Some benefits of peppermint oil:

  1. flavor your food
  2. treat indigestion
  3. prevent or cure dental problems
  4. treat respiratory problems, nausea and headache
  5. boost immune system
  6. regular moisturizer for hair and skin

How To Make Peppermint OilHow To Make Peppermint OilHow To Make Peppermint OilHow To Make Peppermint OilHow To Make Peppermint Oil

How To Make Peppermint Oil
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • fresh peppermint leaves
  • olive oil
Instructions
  1. crush the peppermint leaves with your hands or a spoon
  2. add the crushed leaves into a glass jar and pack them in there until the jar is full
  3. fill the jar with olive oil covering all the leaves, till the neck level
  4. let the oil steep in now. If you live in a warm place let the oil steep in for 2 days in the sun and shake the glass jar every 12 hours. If it is winter where you live, place the jar in your cabinet and let it steep in for 1 month.
  5. after the steeping period is finished, strain the oil using a double folded cheesecloth or using a fine strainer.
  6. store the peppermint oil in a dark, dry and warm place. It will stay for 3-6 months.

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Posted in: Non-dessert

Love to hear your comments on this!

Comments: 6

  1. Alberta June 28, 2013 at 3:54 am Reply

    This looks and sounds to good to be true. From what I am seeing some how the leaves were not crushed and from the above pictures the leaves look like they are just laying in this jar. How do they change into your 3rd and 4th picture as being liquid form? I would really like to know. As I have a plant that is crowing out of control. Also, how does this oil after I try and make it help with cure or prevent dental problems?

    • adriana June 28, 2013 at 11:38 am Reply

      Please read the recipe instructions and follow the steps: …strain the oil using a double folded cheesecloth or a fine strainer…

    • Lord Rybec September 23, 2013 at 4:18 am Reply

      Crushed does not mean pulped. Notice how the leaves in the pictures have dark spots? This is crushed. You can crush them with your hands, by squeezing a bunch of the leaves in your hands until they start to get damaged, though this will rub some of the oils off onto your hands. Probably the easiest way to crush them is to put them into the jar, then press the bottom of a fairly flat bottomed cup into the jar nice and hard.

      Crushing the leaves damages the cells of the leaves. In theory, this allows the olive oil deeper access into the leaves, and thus more essential oils can be extracted. Note, however, that most of the essential oils in mints are on the surface of the leaves, so I am not certain how much benefit crushing the leaves actually gives. If you plan to use the oil for flavoring foods though, there are flavors deeper in the leaves that do not come from essential oils, which you may want in your finished product. To extract these flavors, crushing the leaves is essential.

  2. mim December 4, 2013 at 9:34 pm Reply

    Can this be used to make peppermint hot chocolate?

    • adriana December 7, 2013 at 3:52 pm Reply

      I think so, but the peppermint taste will be very mild.

  3. […] Peppermint Essential Oil – Rubbed on to my temples seems to help sooth the pain of a migraine and shorten the length of it when used in combination with my regular medicine. I have no idea why this works.  TIP: Peppermint essential oil will be more well tolerated by your skin if it is slightly diluted with a carrier oil. If you grow your own peppermint you can make a peppermint ‘oil infusion’ that will also work for this application to learn how click here. […]

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